Sprained Ankle and Wrist Treatment | Pain Relief Australia

Fast & Free Shipping Australia Wide

Sprain

9 products
  • Foot & Ankle Sleeve Compression Socks
    Regular price
    A$32.99
    Sale price
    A$32.99 A$63.98
    Unit price
    per 
    Sold out
  • LegEase Compression Socks
    Regular price
    A$34.99
    Sale price
    A$34.99 A$69.99
    Unit price
    per 
    Sold out
  • Pain Relief Ankle Wrap
    Regular price
    A$42.99
    Sale price
    A$42.99 A$66.65
    Unit price
    per 
    Sold out
  • Adjustable Foot & Ankle Splint
    Regular price
    A$49.99
    Sale price
    A$49.99 A$82.99
    Unit price
    per 
    Sold out
  • Compression Ankle Sleeve
    Regular price
    A$37.99
    Sale price
    A$37.99 A$69.99
    Unit price
    per 
    Sold out
  • Plus sized Open Toe Compression Socks
    Regular price
    A$69.99
    Sale price
    A$69.99 A$139.99
    Unit price
    per 
    Sold out
  • Plus Size Compression Socks
    Regular price
    A$89.99
    Sale price
    A$89.99 A$179.99
    Unit price
    per 
    Sold out
  • Knee Brace Compression Sleeve
    Regular price
    A$58.99
    Sale price
    A$58.99 A$117.99
    Unit price
    per 
    Sold out

Managing Sprains: Effective Sprain Treatment from Pain Relief Australia

Living an active lifestyle is important for many people, but with any physical activity comes the risk of injuries. One common setback athletes and fitness enthusiasts encounter is sprains. If you're dealing with a wrist, ankle, or any other joint sprain, Pain Relief Australia provides a range of sprain treatments that can promote faster recovery. Our selection of braces and supports is crafted to provide targeted assistance to the injured area, making your return to an active lifestyle a comfortable and successful experience.

Diverse Sprain Types and Tailored Sprain Treatment Approaches

At their core, sprains are injuries to ligaments, the resilient bands of tissue that connect bones to each other within a joint. Ligaments play a vital role in maintaining joint stability and facilitating smooth movements. However, when subjected to excessive force or unnatural motion, they can be stretched, torn, or even ruptured, resulting in a sprain. Depending on the severity of ligament damage, a sprain may be classified into one of three categories:

  • Grade I (Mild): Ligaments are stretched but not torn in mild sprains. It typically results in mild pain, slight swelling, and minimal loss of function. You may even bear weight on the affected joint if you get Grade I sprains.
  • Grade II (Moderate): Moderate sprains involve partial tearing of ligaments, leading to more noticeable symptoms such as moderate pain, swelling, and a reduced ability to use the joint. Mobility may be compromised, and the affected area can feel unstable.
  • Grade III (Severe): Severe sprains are characterised by complete tearing or rupture of ligaments. It results in significant pain, swelling, and a marked loss of joint stability. People with Grade III sprains often find using the affected joint challenging or impossible.

Most Common Sprained Joints

Understanding the specific type of sprain and its root cause is vital for tailoring an effective sprain treatment and rehabilitation plan. While sprains can occur in various joints, the most common locations are the ankles and wrists, along with the knee, hamstring and elbow being vulnerable areas of the body for injury:

  • Ankle sprains: Frequently occurring during activities that involve rapid changes in direction or take place on uneven surfaces, ankle sprains typically happen when the foot rolls inward, leading to stretching or tearing of ligaments on the outside of the ankle.
  • Wrist sprains: Commonly resulting from a fall onto an outstretched hand, wrist sprains involve the overextension or tearing of ligaments.
  • Knee sprains: Often seen in activities that require sudden stops, twists, or direct impact on the knee.
  • Hamstring sprains: Common in sports that involve rapid acceleration or deceleration, such as sprinting, hamstring sprains occur when the muscles and ligaments at the back of the thigh experience stretching or tearing.
  • Elbow sprains: Repetitive motions, such as those in tennis or golf, may cause mild elbow ligament strains or tears.

Additionally, weakening ligaments, reduced bone density, and impaired balance in older people can contribute to a higher likelihood of experiencing sprains.

Immediate Sprain Pain Relief: What to do Within the First 24 Hours?

Prompt and proper treatment in the initial stages of a sprain is crucial for minimising pain, swelling, and long-term damage. If you injure a joint, the optimal course of action is to adhere to the RICE protocol:

  • Rest: Avoid using the injured joint to prevent further damage.
  • Ice: Place an ice pack on the affected area for 15-20 minutes every 2 hours to reduce swelling.
  • Compression: Use a compression bandage or specialised sprained ankle or wrist medical devices to support the injured area and minimise swelling.
  • Elevation: Raise the injured limb above heart level (when possible) to reduce swelling.

Additionally, consider over-the-counter anti-inflammatory and sprain pain relief medications if recommended by a doctor. Seeking prompt medical attention within this critical 24-hour window is pivotal for optimal immediate relief and long-term recovery.

Long-Term Sprain Treatment and Rehab Plan

If you've managed your sprain with first aid, it's time to see a healthcare professional. They'll check you out and request imaging tests like X-rays or MRI scans to assess the severity of the sprain. With a clear understanding of the injury, they can provide personalised advice and sprain treatment options, including pain management strategies, medication, or, in severe cases, surgical intervention.

Sprain Pain Relief with Specialised Medical Devices during Rehab

Managing pain and providing additional support to the healing joint is crucial throughout the rehabilitation process. Pain Relief Australia offers a range of sprained wrist and ankle medical devices, including braces, strapping, sleeves, and supports, designed to alleviate discomfort and promote stability during recovery:

  • Sprained wrist medical devices: Dealing with a sprained wrist can be challenging, but the right medical devices can significantly improve your recovery. For example, a wrist brace may provide joint support, limiting movements that may worsen the sprain. Compression wraps or sleeves can help reduce swelling and enhance blood circulation. In more severe cases, splints or immobilisers may be recommended to restrict movement for proper healing.
  • Sprained ankle medical devices: Ankle sprains require specialised medical devices to support the joint and facilitate a smooth recovery. One of the go-to devices for sprained ankles is an ankle brace that offers stability, preventing excessive movement. Air or gel-filled ankle supports can provide additional compression and a cooling effect. In severe cases, walking boots or ankle immobilisers may help restrict movement for protection during healing.

Choosing the right device for your specific conditions involves considering the type and location of the sprain, the level of support required, and your daily activities. Your doctor can provide valuable insights into these considerations, guiding you towards the most appropriate pain-relief medical device for your needs. It’s also essential to follow their recommendations on proper usage, ensuring that braces, strapping, wraps and supports are worn as directed.

Physiotherapy for Comprehensive Rehabilitation

Physiotherapy plays a pivotal role in sprains' long-term treatment and pain relief, focusing on restoring optimal function, strengthening supporting muscles, and preventing future injuries. Key components of a physiotherapy-based rehabilitation program include:

  • Range of motion exercises: Wrist circles, flexion and extension movements aimed at restoring the normal range of motion in the affected joint.
  • Strengthening exercises: Targeted movements like wrist flexor and extension stretches to build strength in the muscles surrounding the injured ligaments, enhancing stability and reducing the risk of re-injury.
  • Balance and coordination training: Activities to improve proprioception and coordination, including heel-to-toe walking and single-leg stance for preventing falls and re-injury.
  • Joint mobilisation techniques: Rotations, flexions, and extensions to improve joint mobility and reduce stiffness.
  • Functional rehabilitation: Tailored exercises that mimic daily activities or sports-specific movements, like picking up small objects, squeezing tennis balls, or turning a door handle to improve joint mobility, ensuring a smooth transition back to regular life.

Physiotherapists work closely with you to develop a customised rehabilitation plan, taking into account the unique characteristics of the sprain, your fitness level, and your specific goals for recovery.

The frequency of physiotherapy sessions can vary, from initially multiple sessions per week to gradually tapering off as progress is evident. Individual responses to physiotherapy are also variable, so the duration of sprain treatment may be adjusted based on ongoing assessments by the physiotherapist. In general, for mild sprains, physiotherapy may last around 2-6 weeks; in cases of moderate sprains, you'll need more intensive rehabilitation with 6-12 weeks of physiotherapy; severe sprains involving complete ligament tears may require several months of physiotherapy.

Post-Recovery Maintenance as Part of Sprain Treatment

Completing the rehabilitation program does not mark the end of the recovery journey. Returning to normal activities or sports after a sprain requires a phased and cautious approach. Physiotherapists will guide you through a gradual progression, ensuring that the injured joint is reintroduced to activity in a controlled manner.

To minimise the risk of future sprains and maintain joint health, you may be advised to:

  • Continue with strength and conditioning exercises: Maintain a regular exercise routine with resistance training and flexibility exercises to support overall joint health.
  • Regularly check in with your doctor: Periodic health check-ups can help identify emerging issues and develop tailored guidance for long-term joint health.
  • Adopt proper warm-up and cool-down practices: Incorporate light aerobic activity, dynamic stretches, and gentle joint movements into your pre-workout routine to prepare the body and prevent strains. After completing the main activity, gradually decrease the intensity, engage in static stretches, and take a few moments for muscle relaxation and deep breathing.
  • Maintain proper nutrition and hydration: Adequate nutrition, rich in essential vitamins and minerals, promotes tissue repair and strengthens the immune system, helping the body heal faster. Maintaining optimal hydration levels is equally vital as it aids in nutrient transport, supports joint lubrication, and helps prevent muscle cramps.

Investing time and effort in preventive measures is a proactive approach that significantly outweighs the challenges of dealing with injuries later. By nurturing a strong and resilient body, you not only minimise the risk of injuries but also promote longevity, vitality, and a better quality of life.

Professional Pain Relief for Sprains

Recovering from a sprain involves a holistic approach encompassing initial sprain treatment, medical guidance, physiotherapy, and ongoing preventive measures. By implementing such a comprehensive recovery plan, you can resolve immediate issues and build a foundation for long-term joint health and injury prevention. Pain Relief Australia is here to support you on this journey, offering a range of medical devices and pain relief products for sprains. With our convenient Pain Relief Finder, you can always count on us to assist your recovery towards a smoother return to an active and fulfilling lifestyle.

Sprain Treatment FAQ

A sprain and a strain are both injuries affecting the musculoskeletal system, but they differ in the structures involved.

Sprains are caused by the tearing or stretching of ligaments that connect bones and provide stability to joints. They occur when tissues are subjected to excessive force or a sudden twist, extending them beyond their normal range of motion, resulting in varying degrees of damage, from mild stretching to partial or complete tears.

Strains, however, affect the muscles or tendons that connect muscles to bones. Strains typically occur when these tissues are overstretched or torn, often due to overexertion, improper lifting techniques, or repetitive movements.

Sprains can arise from diverse circumstances and activities that expose joints to excessive force or sudden movements. High-impact sports, activities involving sudden changes in direction, such as basketball, netball, soccer, and skiing, pose a significant risk of sprains. Additionally, accidental falls, especially when landing awkwardly or on an outstretched hand, are common causes. Walking on uneven surfaces, lifting heavy objects, and repetitive movements may also cause overuse injuries and challenge the body's balance, resulting in sprains.

The sprain symptoms can vary in intensity based on the severity of the injury, but common indicators include pain, swelling, and bruising in the affected area. The injured joint may also exhibit tenderness upon touch, and you might experience difficulty moving the joint freely. A popping sound might sometimes be heard when the injury occurred. During the sprain treatment, the affected area may change in colour, and the surrounding muscles may tense up in response to the injury.

Doctors employ a multifaceted approach to diagnose a sprain accurately, involving a combination of physical examination, medical history review, and imaging tests. During the physical exam, the healthcare provider assesses the injured joint's range of motion, stability, and any signs of swelling, tenderness, or bruising. By reviewing the patient's medical history, a doctor can understand any pre-existing conditions, previous injuries, or factors that might influence the current sprain. In cases where the severity or extent of ligament damage needs further clarification, imaging tests may be recommended. X-rays help detect fractures and assess bone structure, while MRI or ultrasound scans provide detailed images of soft tissues, helping healthcare professionals determine the extent of the sprain so they may plan an appropriate course of sprain treatment.

The most common types of sprains are associated with specific joints like wrists, ankles and knees. Ankle sprains frequently occur during sports involving sudden direction changes, like basketball, netball or soccer. Wrist sprains result from falls onto outstretched hands, common in activities such as skateboarding. Knee sprains are common in running, netball, football or skiing. In other cases, you may experience thumb, elbow, back, or neck and shoulder sprains, often occurring during sports like skiing, baseball, swimming, or football.

The duration of recovery from a sprain varies depending on the severity and type of sprain. Mild sprains may improve by a few days to a week with rest, ice, compression, and elevation. Moderate sprains can take several weeks, and severe sprains may require months of rehabilitation. Sprain pain relief measures, such as over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medications recommended by your doctor, can help manage discomfort during recovery. Physical therapy and exercises focusing on the injured area contribute to pain relief and long-term rehabilitation, ensuring a gradual return to normal activities without exacerbating the sprain.

Rehabilitating a sprain involves a gradual and targeted exercise regimen to restore range of motion, strengthen muscles, and enhance joint stability. For example, for ankle sprains, ankle circles, resistance band exercises for dorsiflexion and plantarflexion, and balance training on unstable surfaces can aid in recovery. Wrist sprains benefit from controlled flexion and extension exercises, thumb stretches, and grip-strengthening exercises using therapeutic putty or stress balls. The emphasis should be on consulting a health professional, followed by gradual progression, avoiding overexertion, tailoring exercises to your specific needs, promoting pain relief for sprain, facilitating recovery, and preventing future injuries.

Several risk factors and conditions can heighten the likelihood of sprains. A lack of proper warm-up before physical activities and insufficient muscle conditioning contribute most to injuries. Additionally, people with a history of sprains or previous joint injuries may be more susceptible to experiencing sprains in the same or nearby joints. Age, flexibility, and overall physical fitness also play roles in susceptibility. Environmental factors such as slippery surfaces or poor lighting may further contribute to accidents leading to sprains.